<![CDATA[GEOLOGY WITH JEFF SIMPSON - GEONEWS]]>Tue, 11 May 2021 13:21:18 -0700Weebly<![CDATA[China’s Carbon Pollution Surpasses All Developed Countries Combined]]>Sat, 08 May 2021 18:03:15 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/chinas-carbon-pollution-surpasses-all-developed-countries-combined
Carbon pollution from China's bustling, coal-intensive economy last year outstripped carbon pollution of the US, the EU, and other developed nations combined, making up a whopping 27 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.  As China’s economy has grown in the last 30 years, so too have its emissions. While pollution from developed countries has largely been flat since 1990, it has more than tripled in China. The country’s soaring emissions and stable population mean that its per capita emissions have grown quickly, too. At 10.1 tons per person, emissions are just below the 10.5 ton average.  The US still leads the world in per capita emissions, at 17.6 tons per person - ARS TECHNICA
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<![CDATA[New U.S. Climate ‘Normals’ Are Warmer Than Ever - NOAA]]>Fri, 07 May 2021 17:09:52 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/new-us-climate-normals-are-warmer-than-ever-noaa
The official calculation of what constitutes “normal” U.S. climate has been updated, and, to virtually nobody’s surprise, it’s a warmer picture than ever before. The NOAA released an updated set of climate averages for the contiguous United States based on the 30-year period from 1991 to 2020, including more than 9,000 daily reporting stations. It refers to these averages* as “climate normals,” and updates them once every decade. Compared with previous 30-year periods, the climate has turned unambiguously warmer. - Washington Post
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<![CDATA[Widespread Drought in Mexico]]>Wed, 05 May 2021 23:34:49 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/widespread-drought-in-mexico
Mexico is experiencing one of its most widespread and intense droughts in decades. Nearly 85 percent of the country is facing drought conditions as of April 15, 2021. Large reservoirs across the country are standing at exceptionally low levels, straining water resources for drinking, farming, and irrigation. The mayor of Mexico City called it the worst drought in 30 years for the city, which is home to about 9 million people.  This drought doesn't stop at the Arizona borders . The entire SW USA and Mexico are affected.  - NASA
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<![CDATA[Only 3% of Earth’s Land Hasn’t Been Marred by Humans]]>Thu, 29 Apr 2021 01:18:55 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/only-3-of-earths-land-hasnt-been-marred-by-humans
The vast majority of land on Earth — a staggering 97 percent — no longer qualifies as ecologically intact, according to a sweeping survey of Earth’s ecosystems. Over the last 500 years, too many species have been lost, or their numbers reduced, researchers report April 15 in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change. Of the few fully intact ecosystems, only about 11 percent fall within existing protected areas, the researchers found. Much of this pristine habitat exists in northern latitudes, in Canada’s boreal forests or Greenland’s tundra, which aren’t bursting with biodiversity. But chunks of the species-rich rainforests of the Amazon, Congo and Indonesia also remain intact. - Science News
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<![CDATA[California Orders Nestlé to Stop Siphoning Spring Water]]>Thu, 29 Apr 2021 00:55:18 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/california-orders-nestle-to-stop-siphoning-spring-water
California water officials have moved to stop Nestlé from siphoning millions of gallons of water out of California’s San Bernardino forest, which it bottles and sells as Arrowhead brand water, as drought conditions worsen across the state. The draft cease-and-desist order, which still requires approval from the California Water Resources Control Board, is the latest development in a protracted battle between the bottled water company and local environmentalists, who for years have accused Nestlé of draining water supplies at the expense of local communities and ecosystems. - HCN
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<![CDATA[Demand for Water is Rapidly Increasing as Supply Dwindles - Video & Article]]>Thu, 22 Apr 2021 20:50:05 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/demand-for-water-is-rapidly-increasing-as-supply-dwindles-video-article

Limited access to clean water remains a struggle for millions of Americans. And lack of water access is expected to become an even greater problem in the coming years across the U.S. and around the world. In West Virginia, many households in McDowell County rely on collecting water from fresh springs, which might freeze over in the winter or run dry in the summer. Bob McKinney is the Appalachia Water Project manager for DigDeep, a nonprofit that works to provide water to Americans who wouldn't otherwise have access. He says he estimates that about half of McDowell's population doesn't have reliable running water in their homes. - CBS News
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<![CDATA[Humanity’s Greatest Ally Against Climate Change is Earth Itself]]>Thu, 22 Apr 2021 18:21:48 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/humanitys-greatest-ally-against-climate-change-is-earth-itself
Warming waters & worsening storms caused by climate change have weakened the kelp forests. Sewage & sediment spill onto them from cities on the shore. Most significantly, the demise of important predators such as otters and sea stars has led to an explosion in the population of sea urchins, which eat kelp. Huge swaths of underwater forest are being replaced by urchin “barrens” — denuded landscapes, desolate but for the spiky, spherical animals. Eventually, even the urchins start to starve.  Humans have put our planet on a path toward disaster. If people keep polluting at the current rate, scientists say, climate change will cause prolonged droughts, devastating storms, collapsing ecosystems and vanishing species. Coastal cities will be deluged by sea level rise; widespread food and water shortages will lead to the deaths of millions. To avoid this fate, civilization must rapidly transform — cutting carbon emissions 40 percent by 2030 and reaching “net zero” by the middle of the century. - Washington Post
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<![CDATA[There Are No Clear Winners in the West’s Water Wars]]>Thu, 22 Apr 2021 18:14:20 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/there-are-no-clear-winners-in-the-wests-water-wars
Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.  Currently the U.S. Supreme Court has on its docket a case between Texas, New Mexico and Colorado and another between Mississippi and Tennessee. The court has already ruled this term on cases pitting Texas against New Mexico and Florida against Georgia.  Climate stresses are raising the stakes. Rising temperatures require farmers to use more water to grow the same amount of crops. Prolonged and severe droughts decrease available supplies. Wildfires are burning hotter and lasting longer. Fires bake the soil, reducing forests’ ability to hold water, increasing evaporation from barren land and compromising water supplies. - HCN
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<![CDATA[As Mega-Drought Persists, Lake Mead Could Sink to Record Low Later This Year]]>Mon, 19 Apr 2021 18:04:22 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/as-mega-drought-persists-lake-mead-could-sink-to-record-low-later-this-year
Wracked by drought, climate change and overuse, a key reservoir on the Colorado River could sink to historically low levels later this year, new US government projections show, potentially triggering significant water cutbacks in some states as early as next year.  The projections released by the US Bureau of Reclamation show that Lake Mead, largest reservoir in the US and a vital water supply to millions across the Southwest, could fall later this year to its lowest levels since it was filled in the 1930s. - CNN
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<![CDATA[How a Shocking Env disaster was Uncovered off the CA Coast After 70 Years]]>Mon, 19 Apr 2021 17:53:46 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/how-a-shocking-env-disaster-was-uncovered-off-the-ca-coast-after-70-years
Just 10 miles off the coast of Los Angeles lurks an environmental disaster over 70 years in the making, which few have ever heard about... until now.   Working with little more than rumors and a hunch, curiosity guided David Valentine 3,000 feet below the ocean's surface. A few hours of research time and an autonomous robotic submersible unearthed what had been hidden since the 1940s: countless barrels of toxic waste, laced with DDT, littering the ocean floor in between Long Beach and Catalina Island. - CBS
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