<![CDATA[GEOLOGY WITH JEFF SIMPSON - GEONEWS]]>Fri, 16 Apr 2021 13:44:36 -0700Weebly<![CDATA[Can We Cling to Hope of Avoiding 1.5°C Heating?]]>Fri, 16 Apr 2021 19:15:36 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/can-we-cling-to-hope-of-avoiding-15c-heating
Australia’s leading scientists made a significant global-scale declaration about the fight to deal with the climate crisis this week – but you could be forgiven if you missed it.  In what it described as a landmark report, the Australian Academy of Science painted a picture of what could happen to the country under 3C of global heating, including ecosystems made unrecognisable, food production being compromised and people’s ability to exist and survive in hotter and longer heatwaves regularly tested.  The central message? There is no time to wait.  But lying within the report was another substantial claim – that limiting global heating to 1.5° C was now “virtually impossible”. - Guardian
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<![CDATA[Frackalachia and the Great Fracking Jobs Myth (Podcast - 37 Minutes)]]>Fri, 16 Apr 2021 19:12:39 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/frackalachia-and-the-great-fracking-jobs-myth-podcast-37-minutesWhen a report makes oil and gas companies—and the politicians they help elect—this mad, you know the author is on to something. Researcher Sean O'Leary, with the Ohio River Valley Institute, joins us to talk about his new report, which found that the local economic benefit of fracking to communities in the Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia gas corridor was slim to none. - Drilled]]><![CDATA[What If Everyone Ate Beans Instead of Beef? (Video)]]>Fri, 16 Apr 2021 19:05:06 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/what-if-everyone-ate-beans-instead-of-beef-video
In America, beef accounts for 37 percent of all human-induced methane released into the air. Methane is 23 times as warming to the climate as carbon dioxide.  Editor James Hamblin highlighted research that found one dietary change—replacing beef with beans—could get the U.S. as much as 74 percent of the way to meeting 2020 greenhouse-gas emission goals. As Hamblin notes, it’s worth being reminded that individual choices matter. - Atlantic
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<![CDATA[The Planet's Biggest Environmental Problems, Pt 2 - Living on Earth Podcast]]>Fri, 09 Apr 2021 02:10:05 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/april-08th-2021From species extinction to waste, land degradation to climate change and pollution, from Kenya to Australia, India, and France, this two-part special explores some of the most urgent environmental problems facing the planet — and how they might be solved. In part two, we hear about deforestation in Kashmir, puzzling water scarcity in Kenya and attempts to reduce severe air pollution in Delhi. - DW]]><![CDATA[The Planet's Biggest Environmental Problems, Pt 1 - Living on Earth Podcast]]>Fri, 09 Apr 2021 02:05:25 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/the-planets-biggest-environmental-problems-pt-1-living-on-earth-podcastFrom species extinction to waste, land degradation to climate change and pollution, from Kenya to Australia, India, and France, this two-part special explores some of the most urgent environmental problems facing the planet — and how they might be solved. In part one, we hear about the struggle to save a native Tasmanian species from extinction, plus: French solutions to a sickening waste pile. - DW]]><![CDATA[Meet Arizona's Water One-Percenters]]>Thu, 08 Apr 2021 18:56:18 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/meet-arizonas-water-one-percenters
In Phoenix, two cities are emerging: one is water-rich, the other water-poor  Every two weeks, Dawn Upton floods her lawn. She treks into her back yard, twists open two valves big as dinner plates, and within minutes is ankle-deep in water.  “You have to have irrigation boots, girl,” she says during a video tour of her property in Mesa, a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona. She flips her camera to reveal green grass, then tilts her phone skyward at four towering palm trees. As she walks, she pans across pecan, pomegranate, and citrus trees – lemon, orange, a grapefruit sapling. A tortoise, between 80 and 100lb, lumbers toward her, chewing. “There’s Simba,” Upton says. “Hey buddy! What is that, Simba? You can’t eat it.” She pats him affectionately on the head. - Guardian
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<![CDATA[Agencies: Arizona farmers should expect less water in 2022]]>Thu, 08 Apr 2021 18:53:29 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/agencies-arizona-farmers-should-expect-less-water-in-2022
State officials are putting farmers in south-central Arizona on notice that the continuing drought means a “substantial cut" in deliveries of Colorado River water is expected next year.  A statement issued Friday by the state Department of Water Resources and the Central Arizona Project said an expected shortage declaration “will result in a substantial cut to Arizona’s share of the river, with reductions falling largely to central Arizona agricultural users." - AZ Family
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<![CDATA[Wind and solar energy are job creators. Which states are taking advantage?]]>Thu, 08 Apr 2021 18:50:55 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/wind-and-solar-energy-are-job-creators-which-states-are-taking-advantage
This analysis presents one way to look at renewable energy jobs in all 50 states. Every state already employs people in wind and solar energy. Each state also has a given amount of wind and solar potential. Some states are translating their natural potential into jobs, while others lag far behind.  - Yale Climate Connections
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<![CDATA[Water Wars (Living Planet Podcast)]]>Thu, 01 Apr 2021 18:36:19 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/water-wars-living-planet-podcast
In the Global North, clean water is taken for granted — but in some places it means the difference between life and death. "Water wars" are taking place as people fight failing systems, and combat climate change, to access enough clean water for all. From Chile to South Africa, India to the Caribbean, we hear about those water conflicts that are flowing beneath the surface. (30 minutes) - DW
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<![CDATA[The API Pushed Climate Denial Earlier Than Thought - Podcast]]>Thu, 01 Apr 2021 18:30:04 GMThttp://softpath.org/geonews/the-api-was-pushing-climate-denial-way-earlier-than-anyone-thought
Like tobacco in the 1970s, fossil fuel interests have sown doubt about climate change, a phenomenon their own scientists predicted, accepted, and studied.  Stanford researcher Ben Franta joins to talk about a bombshell new discovery: the American Petroleum Institute not only knew about climate change back in the 70s, it started pushing climate denial as early as 1980. (26 minutes) - Drilled Podcast 
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